This overview provides a detailed look at energy developments based on complete supply and demand data for 2016 for 150 countries and regions and where available provisional official supply or production data

As part of its ‘Clean Energy for all Europeans’ package, the European Commission in 2016 proposed an update of the Renewable Energy Directive for the period 2021 – 2030 (RED II). A final compromise document was agreed among EU Institutions on June 14, 2018.

The electricity sector attracted the largest share of energy investments in 2017, sustained by robust spending on grids, exceeding the oil and gas industry for the second year in row, as the energy sector moves toward greater electrification, according to the International Energy Agency’s latest review of global energy spending.

Integration of large-scale variable renewable energy (VRE) generation resources -- wind and solar -- into national grids has been gaining importance as costs of these technologies, especially that of solar, continues to fall rapidly.

India has consistently been climbing up its Global Innovation Index (GII) rankings since 2015, but the country still has to improve on many indicators to catch up with China and others in the list of 126 nations.

Often people assume that fossil fuel subsidies help the poor by making energy more affordable. In fact, most fossil fuel subsidies are not working well for energy access and poverty goals. The annual fossil fuel subsidy expenditure of USD 425 billion could be better invested by governments towards SDG outcomes.

Off-grid renewable energy solutions have emerged as mainstream and support the expanding access to modern energy services in a timely and environmentally sustainable manner. Off-grid renewables are able to deliver a wide spectrum of electricity services for households, public services, commercial and industrial uses.

Installing rooftop solar panels, or even buying power from a community rooftop solar plant, may make electricity bill payments cheaper, according to a recent study.

In order to accelerate the global transition to clean energy, it is important to systematically identify the risks associated with RE deployment and address these risks through a combination of policy and market-based interventions.

This brief examines the issue of curtailment for technical and commercial reasons and its impact on stakeholders; must-run status for renewable power; and the prospective role of granting compensation for grid unavailability and instability.

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