Urban water supplies are critical to the growth of the city and the wellbeing of its citizens. However, these supplies can be vulnerable to hydrological extremes, such as droughts and floods, especially if they are the main source of water for the city. Maintaining these supplies and preparing for future conditions is a crucial task for water managers, but predicting hydrological extremes is a challenge.

Among nuts, peanut is considered as superfood and has been effective in treating malnutrition across the globe. Peanuts have more protein and 30 essential vitamins and minerals that are effective to combat acute malnutrition. Nutritive value of peanuts reveals that nearly half of the mass of the kernel is made of lipids, whereas protein and carbohydrate constitute nearly one-fifth to one-fourth of the kernel mass.

Original Source

Venomous snakebite is a global serious health issue and in India high rate of mortality is caused by Naja naja (Indian cobra). To evaluate anti-cobra venom activity and identify lead molecules in Aegle marmelos, in vitro and in silico screening was carried out. Leaves, stem and root bark of A. marmelos were extracted in ethanol, methanol and hexane and maximum yield was obtained in methanol.

Original Source

Road traffic accidents (RTAs) have become a serious problem worldwide as they incur losses of around 2% of a country’s gross domestic product (GDP). RTAs are one of the major causes of death and injury in developing countries like India. To enable governments to take policy decisions on road safety, it is necessary that good research is undertaken to estimate the cost of accidents. This kind of study will help governments make important decisions on investment in traffic safety, improvement of roads and other facilities.

This study was conducted to examine the changes in future temperature and precipitation of the Kabul River Basin in Afghanistan by using the outputs of three general circulation models (GCMs) under two representative concentration pathway (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) scenarios.

Original Source

Aerosols play an important role in climate change processes. Among the various aerosols, black carbon (BC) has been recognized as the second most important anthropogenic agent for climate change and the primary tracer for adverse health effects caused by air pollution. The increasing concentration of BC in the atmosphere has now become a matter of serious concern, especially in the high Himalayan glaciated region that has the most vulnerable ecosystem with pristine environment, rich biodiversity and pollution-free ambient air quality.

We studied the impact of the odd–even traffic rule (implemented in Delhi during 1–15 January 2016) on primary traffic emissions using measurements of 13 volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and methane at a strategic arterial road in Delhi (28.57N, 77.11E, 220 m amsl). Whole air samples (n = 27) were collected during the odd–even rule active (OA) and inactive (OI) days, and analysed at the IISER Mohali Atmospheric Chemistry Facility.

Original Source

Soil fertility has direct implications on the agricultural production scenarios of a region. Surface soil samples at 1 km grid were collected to assess the fertility status of Lakhimpur district (Assam) in North East India. Fertility parameters like soil organic carbon, available nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, iron, manganese, zinc and copper were determined using standard analytical procedure.

Original Source

In the present study, 20 species of local underutilized leafy vegetables commonly consumed by tribals of Jharkhand, India have been identified through market survey of seven districts of the state. Among the leafy vegetables sold in fresh form, Amaranthus gangeticus was found highest in quantity followed by Amaranthus viridis, Ipomoea aquatica, Chenopodium album and Basella alba. Amongst those sold in dried form, Cassia tora was found highest in quantity followed by Vangueria spinosa and Ipomoea batatas.

The theoretical concepts “urban informality,” “periphery,” and “everyday state,” primarily emerging from the “new geographies” of the Global South, are used to make sense of the complicated state–society interactions leading to the transformation of land at the rural–urban interface of the postcolonial metropolitan capital of Delhi. The history of land development in a village called Khora is examined, which, located at the intersection of Delhi, Noida and Ghaziabad, has transformed from a sparsely populated village in 1971 to one of the densest “unauthorised colonies” in Asia in 2011.

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